Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (All Resources)

The Texas Faculty Collaboratives (Website)

Rating: 2.7/5 (19 votes cast)

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The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) has established the college and career readiness standards Faculty Collaborative Initiative to provide faculty at institutions of higher education who prepare pre-service teachers with the latest information and resources regarding the implementation of the standards.

The activities of the Faculty Collaborative are designed to ensure that prospective teachers receive preparation that is closely aligned with the College and Career Readiness Standards. This will in turn allow new teachers to better prepare their students to be college-ready.

The College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) were jointly developed and adopted by the THECB and the Texas Education Agency (TEA). There are standards in four content areas—mathematics, science, English language arts and social studies—as well as a set of cross disciplinary standards. K-12 schools in Texas are incorporating these standards into their curricula and instruction, and the Faculty Collaborative is helping institutions of higher education incorporate these standards into their teacher preparation programs.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Building a STEM Equity Pipeline for Texas (Document)

Rating: 3.1/5 (18 votes cast)

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by Susie Wheeler: Amarillo College
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Susie Wheeler)
Website Planning and Development (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.4/5 (12 votes cast)

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Planning and developing a website for online student support is a critical requirement for ensuring student success and retention. The website facilitates student access to support services that are necessary for them to be successful in college, and it affords students comparable access to the same support services available to students on campus. A student services website ensures compliance with regulatory requirements of online programs. This chapter will 1) explore procedures necessary for planning and developing a website; 2) explore the technology considerations and infrastructure needed to ensure website success in the delivery of online student services; and, 3) identify the personnel needed to plan and develop a successful website for online student services. It is difficult to prioritize the importance of procedures, technology, or people as all of the outlined steps are interdependent for understanding the framework of successful website planning.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Helen Torres, M.A., Director of Distance Education, San Antonio College )
Virtual Student Center (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.1/5 (11 votes cast)

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The face of the typical online student is ever changing. A distance student may be fresh out of high school, the baby-boomer seeking new skills, the professional seeking a promotion or the student juggling work, home and social demands. Academic success for these students is due to various factors. They are motivated and focused but could be left out of the social climate that greatly contributes to academic success.

The National Center for Education Statistics conducted a study of Distance Education courses and offerings for the 2000-2001 academic years. The study found “an estimated 2,876,000 enrollments in college-level, credit-granting distance education courses, with 82 percent of these at the undergraduate level.” With enrollment rates continuously rising, online learner needs are growing as well. It is hard for online students to feel connected to the institution.

Currently, retention in online courses is dramatically lower than in the typical face-to-face class. “One explanation for high dropout rates and dissatisfaction with distance delivered courses may relate to a missing sense of community in non face-to-face courses. In discussing the importance of interactivity, DeVries & Wheeler (1996) discuss the lack of face-to-face contact as a major barrier for distance education” (qtd. in Hill).


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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Rita Vela Help Desk Specialist South Texas College)
Supporting Online Education Students in a Rural Environment (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 2.9/5 (14 votes cast)

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Distance education is defined as a formal learning activity which occurs when students and instructors are separated by geographic distance or by time, often supported by communications technology such as television, videotape, computers, email, mail, or interactive videoconferencing . Distance education has come to the forefront of our society as a way to provide access to education for students regardless of geographical proximity to an educational institution. The evolution of online courses has significantly changed the opportunities available to students living in rural areas, as well as the expectations that students have of rural community colleges to provide quality education that they might not otherwise have access to. According to Arthur M. Cohen, a clear definition of “rural” does not exist for community colleges. For the purpose of this monograph, a rural college is defined as a public community college located 30 minutes away from a major metropolitan area.

The distinguishing characteristics of a rural community college as opposed to an urban college are: their geographically dispersed service areas, accessibility to resources, and often, access to a pool of qualified personnel. An area that is problematic for rural colleges is the ability to support rural students in the distance environment. Student support is a support system in place at an institution to help ensure student success both academically and socially such as access to advising, counseling, financial aid, admissions, student activities, library services, and student technical support.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Jimidene Murphey, Professor and Program Coordinator of English, Clarendon College )
Supporting First Generation Online Students (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 2.6/5 (10 votes cast)

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First generation college students are the first in their families to go to college; neither of their parents have a college degree. When these students register for distance learning courses, they experience additional challenges than those encountered by on-campus first generation students. Characteristically, first generation online students do not starkly differ from on-campus first generation students, but the challenges they face are compounded for the online students, who often have limited if any access to student services and academic support.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Maricela Garcia Director of Distance Education South Texas College )
Online Testing (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.8/5 (12 votes cast)

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Students enroll in distance education courses for a variety of reasons: family responsibilities, employment, gas prices, student living in rural areas, student in the military, or social anxiety disorder. With technology becoming easier to use and more affordable, students may choose to purchase the necessary technology and take advantage on courses taught online.

Most distance education students can access college or university student services programs by never having to visit the campus, except perhaps, when it comes time to test. Because of test security and such issues as plagiarism and cheating, testing may have to be administered in a proctored environment; either on or off campus.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Paul Goertemiller, Director, Testing Services, Tyler Junior College)
Online Freshman Orientation (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.1/5 (12 votes cast)

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Most students enter institutions of higher education for the purpose of attaining an academic goal. The objective of student retention is shared by administrators, faculty, and student services professionals as well as the students and their parents. Most institutions strive to insure that a firm foundation of preparation for the incoming student will provide the understanding of the tools necessary for a successful college experience. Freshman orientations are designed to address those needs.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Linda Bilides, M.Ed. Program Manager, College Services North Harris Montgomery Community College District)
Online Counseling (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.2/5 (10 votes cast)

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Students come to college with a variety of challenges. The primary purpose of counseling is to aid students in making decisions related to their future career, academic or educational, and personal or social needs. Online counseling can be a viable option for those needing assistance.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Doris Rhea Coy, Ph.D. Northern Kentucky University )
Online Career Services (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.5/5 (12 votes cast)

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What are the fundamentals for building a career services website? First, you will want a site that will work for both your online and traditional students. Second, the services you provide will be influenced by your institution’s mission statement as well as the population that you plan to serve. Finally, the actual services that you offer will form the framework of your website.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Bryan Baker Director, Career Services Tyler Junior College )
Online Advising (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.6/5 (13 votes cast)

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Students come to our institutions with varied levels of understanding of the educational planning required to successfully complete their educational goals. According to The National Academic Advising Association (NACADA), “The primary purpose of an academic advising program is to assist students in the development of meaningful educational plans that are compatible with their life goals. Academic advising should be viewed as a continuous process of clarification and evaluation”.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Carolyn Foster, M.A. Counselor/Professor San Antonio College)
Library Services for Remote Users (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.2/5 (10 votes cast)

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Libraries and library services are hardly new concepts. Since the days of the Alexandria Library, mankind has attempted to collect, preserve, and make information more readily available. What has changed, however, is the way information is disseminated since the advent of Internet. In academic libraries, the challenge is to provide information to the user who could be as close as in the dorm on-campus or as faraway as the user halfway around the world. Users now expect their quest for information to be easy and convenient. Distance users may also not be able to differentiate between high-quality information and that of lesser quality when searching for sources. Although many institutions define their Distance Learning (DL) students as only those who are remote from the campus, most libraries include those students who are enrolled in perhaps a combination of traditional classroom instruction and in Distance Education (DE) courses. With these kinds of challenges, consideration as to the best practices for providing information must become a priority.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Marian N. Jackson, MLS Director of Library Services Tyler Junior College)
Health & Wellness Services for the Online Student (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.0/5 (12 votes cast)

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Students today have extremely busy lives with most working full or part-time jobs. In addition, the demographics of the distance education population tend to be non-traditional students. These individuals are generally raising a family at the same time they are working to achieve their college education. A student that has a well balanced life, including good health and wellness habits, will be a more productive student.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Stephanie Jones, Ed.D. South Plains College )
Determining Student Readiness for Online Instruction (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.2/5 (13 votes cast)

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This document examines a variety of resources and presents a brief overview of current best practices that may be used in determining student readiness and equipping students for success in online instruction.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Santos Martinez, Helen Torres, Vickie Giesel)
Creating an Effective Orientation for Online Students (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.6/5 (13 votes cast)

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As the number of programs and course offerings continues to increase, many students are taking distance education courses for the first time. More and more degree programs offer online courses as part of the curriculum; even entire degrees are conferred to students who never leave the virtual classroom. As institutions expand their distance education offerings are students being adequately prepared to succeed in the online environment? As evidenced by high attrition rates and poor academic performance, many of the students who have access to enroll in online courses are not prepared to succeed in those courses (Carr 2000).
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Duane Durrett Vice President, Student Services, Weatherford College)
Creating a Framework for Online Technical Support (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.5/5 (13 votes cast)

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How can you provide a campus community with robust technical support for their online learners? Many colleges do so by forming a Distance Learning Committee with a broad scope of responsibilities in the creation and implementation of a campus-wide Distance Learning Plan.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Frances Cisneros Jenks and Jesse Diaz Northwest Vista College)
Communication Support for Distance Learners (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.8/5 (8 votes cast)

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Communication has been shown consistently to be a key element of retention for online and other remote learners. A lack of communication between students and instructors, unanswered questions, or shuffling of students from one place or phone to another without meeting their needs has been cited as a major cause for course drops. “Some administrators and faculty members attribute the lower rates in distance-education courses to demographics, saying that distance-education students are often older, and thus busier, than traditional college students. However, others blame the nature of distance education, arguing that online and television courses will never be able to supply the personal interaction that some students crave”.

Setting up a communication center – based on website, e-mail, and phone-based services – can be a key element of assuring that communication occurs, helping students receive the support they need. Some communication centers offer students a virtual “one-stop-shop” for support services where a simple call can provide the financial aid, advisement, and registration support to begin classes. Once registered, students can reach other services electronically and may be contacted regularly from the center to assure connection and communication continues.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Dale Longbine, Director of Customer Services, Amarillo College)
Building an Online Student Newspaper (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.4/5 (12 votes cast)

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Most colleges have a student newspaper. The exact composition and nature will vary greatly from college to college. Larger colleges will be more inclined to be larger in scope, multiple pages with photographs and advertising produced by students in a journalism department while smaller colleges may produce something more in the nature of a newsletter outlining upcoming campus events.

There are a lesser number of colleges whose student newspaper is online. Our purpose is to give consideration as to what are the best practices in converting a traditional student newspaper to an online format or creating an online student newspaper from scratch.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Lance Zimmerman, Director of Distance Learning, Texas State Technical College - Waco)
Admissions Issues for Distance Education Students (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.4/5 (10 votes cast)

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With the increase in distance education students, colleges and universities must provide a means to gather admission documentation to be able to admit these students. Best practices need to be put in place to include providing an admissions application to the distance education student as well as a means to process that application and its data once it is received by the institution. Processes to receive and process the additional admission paperwork and requirements must also be established. Other issues that must be addressed when examining best practices in the admissions of distance education students include security of data and communicating with distance education applicants.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Dennis Crowson, Registrar, Blinn College )
ADA Issues for the Online Student (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 2.8/5 (10 votes cast)

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With the emergence of online and distance learning courses, schools must look at providing services for students with disabilities who are seeking to take advantage of the new teaching technology. ADA has raised expectations for provision of services. Institutions are expected make information accessible to all students.

Depending on the disability some students actually perform better in the online classroom. Students who have learning disabilities often have difficulty taking notes in the classroom setting. Online environments already provide a copy of lecture notes. The online classroom setting also allows students who have difficulty with mobility or chronic health problems to access information from the comfort of their homes. Additionally, students who are deaf or hard of hearing are able to get a copy of the instructor’s notes rather than having to utilize an interpreter and/or a note taker. Students who are blind or visually impaired can access notes through screen readers although classroom chats are a little more challenging.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Rito Silva Jr, Director of Alice Campus, Coastal Bend College )
Podcasting for Health Occupations & Nursing Education (Website)

Rating: 3.1/5 (10 votes cast)

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The purpose of this project is to provide training and technical assistance to community college faculty on the use of podcasts in their Health Occupations & Nursing Education to enhance online and web assisted instruction.

The grant will target 10 community colleges in central and east Texas who will send a two member team to training in October 2009. Each participant will be given tools to implement podcasting in their courses.

This team will return to their home campus and with the help of the project staff disseminate the training to others on their campus.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Texas A&M University Commerce)
TEXASgenuine Environment Overview (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.1/5 (14 votes cast)

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Dr. Pam Cox-Otto: Interact President & CEO presents:
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) hired Interact Communications to create a brand that would serve the career and technical education program needs of the entire college system.
Creating a brand for 54 community and technical colleges requires substantial data collection and analysis. The goal of the research is to make sure that all communities and schools have an emotional understanding and tie to the brand for the system. Each of the 7 regions of Texas was considered in the research as well as multiple demographics including external audiences such as high school students, parents of high school students, general community needs, business and industry needs, and internal audiences such as current college students, faculty, staff, administration, and college alumni.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Pam Cox-Otto)
TEXASgenuine Brand Rollout (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.1/5 (20 votes cast)

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Dr. Pam Cox-Otto: Interact President & CEO presents:
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) hired Interact Communications to create a brand that would serve the career and technical education program needs of the entire college system.
Creating a brand for 54 community and technical colleges requires substantial data collection and analysis. The goal of the research is to make sure that all communities and schools have an emotional understanding and tie to the brand for the system. Each of the 7 regions of Texas was considered in the research as well as multiple demographics including external audiences such as high school students, parents of high school students, general community needs, business and industry needs, and internal audiences such as current college students, faculty, staff, administration, and college alumni.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Pam Cox-Otto)
Online Teaching (Website)

Rating: 3.2/5 (5 votes cast)

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(Demonstration site currently available for use; the final site will be completed in 2011)

This set of modules will assist in preparing faculty to teach online and hybrid/blended courses. They include information on key issues in online education such as accessibility, creating an inviting online classroom, facilitating participation in an online environment, and various legal issues that pertain to online and hybrid education. This set of modules was created by Lone Star College.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Lone Star College)
Reading Comprehension (Website)

Rating: 4.0/5 (6 votes cast)

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Students often need guidance to improve their reading comprehension, but many teachers have not had specific training in how to help students become more effective readers. These modules provide insights into reading difficulties and effective strategies to improve reading comprehension skills in college courses across the disciplines. This set of modules was created by The University of Texas at El Paso.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: The University of Texas at El Paso)
Foreign Language Teaching Methods (Website)

Rating: 4.3/5 (4 votes cast)

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Foreign Language Teaching Methods focuses on 12 different aspects of language teaching, each taught by a different expert instructor. The site contains video footage from an actual methods course held in Spring, 2009 at The University of Texas at Austin. This flexible resource is designed to be used by foreign language teachers including English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) as a component of a classroom methods course, a stand-alone course for independent learners, or as a means of obtaining professional development credits. This set of modules was created by The University of Texas at Austin.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: The University of Texas at Austin)
Critical Thinking (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

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Students in all classes at all levels can profit from improved critical thinking. Teachers prepared with tested pedagogical techniques based upon the latest research will be able to help students learn how to think critically, identify skills and problem areas, transfer skills across contexts, and reflect upon their thinking habits. This set of modules was created by The University of Texas at Austin.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: The University of Texas at Austin)
Focus on the Student: Critical Thinking in the 21st Century (Website)

Rating: 3.3/5 (4 votes cast)

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Problem Based Learning
South Texas College, partnering with South Plains College and Collin County Community College District, will develop and implement a state-wide critical thinking training program, Focus on the Student: Critical Thinking in the 21st Century. Designed after the National Science Foundation funded The Case Files, this new program will impact 13 Texas community colleges, train over 100 faculty, and impact hundreds of technical students.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Faculty Development Modules for Online Teaching (Website)

Rating: 4.8/5 (4 votes cast)

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Partnering with Spring ISDs Virtual School and Sam Houston State University, the Lone Star College-Online team created a seamless transition across the continuum of the K-12 teacher through university-level professor, for the online and hybrid classroom. -Lonestar College
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Emerging Technologies (Website)

Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Comments

Texas State Technical College's Emerging Technologies identifies emerging technology trends, evaluates potential workforce implications and recommends new courses and programs for two-year colleges in Texas. The purpose of this program is to ensure Texas employers continue to have the highly skilled workforce necessary to compete in an increasingly global and technologically complex marketplace.

  • Identify and recommend new career and technology education curriculum for Texas.

  • Enhance the economic competitiveness of Texas.

  • Produce detailed analysis on emerging technology topics.

  • Guide grant funding and grant writers to support new CTE curriculum development projects.




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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Texas State Technical College)
Discussing Treatment & Making Recommendations (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Comments

A series of course modules developed by Lone Star College - CyFair that can be used as supplemental instruction or embedded modules in health occupation introductory courses. The modules are designed to assist ESOL students in improving their communication skills with patients as well as address the cultural differences they face in the medical workplace. The modules will provide students with visual, aural and conceptual information about critical words, idiomatic expressions and cultural issues utilized in a health care setting.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Irina Patten, Prescription for ESL Student Success )
Diagnosis (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 4.2/5 (5 votes cast)

Comments

A series of course modules developed by Lone Star College - CyFair that can be used as supplemental instruction or embedded modules in health occupation introductory courses. The modules are designed to assist ESOL students in improving their communication skills with patients as well as address the cultural differences they face in the medical workplace. The modules will provide students with visual, aural and conceptual information about critical words, idiomatic expressions and cultural issues utilized in a health care setting.
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Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Kathy Najafi, Prescription for ESL Student Success )
Describing Pain (Interactive Training Module)

Rating: 3.7/5 (3 votes cast)

Comments

A series of course modules developed by Lone Star College - CyFair that can be used as supplemental instruction or embedded modules in health occupation introductory courses. The modules are designed to assist ESOL students in improving their communication skills with patients as well as address the cultural differences they face in the medical workplace. The modules will provide students with visual, aural and conceptual information about critical words, idiomatic expressions and cultural issues utilized in a health care setting.
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Provider:
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (by: Irina Patten, Prescription for ESL Student Success )